Architectural Salvage to Receive Supplemental Funding for Involuntary Move

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Greensboro City Council unanimously passed a resolution on Tuesday night to authorize the City Manager to enter into a supplemental agreement to provide funding for Architectural Salvage’s imminent move.

Architectural Salvage is a program of Preservation Greensboro that collects materials from historic properties that are scheduled to be razed. Since 1993 Architectural Salvage has kept an estimated 20 tons of construction debris from being dumped into landfills. The program also allows the City to receive federal funding by keeping the City in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Architectural Salvage has been located at the 90-year-old, 15,800 square foot building at 300 Bellameade St since 1998.

The property was purchased by the Carroll Fund, an entity of Carroll Companies, owned by Roy Carroll. Carroll is the developer behind major projects in Greensboro that include Centerpointe on Elm St., Hayleigh Village, Innisbrook and the Shops at Brittway.

Carroll plans to demolish the building to make room for a $50 million mixed-use development project. Architectural Salvage must be out of the building by June 15.

On May 19 Preservation Greensboro sent a letter to City Manager, Jim Westmoreland, requesting that the city assist with the financial burden of the organization’s move.

The letter states, “Since ASG provides recycling of old building materials, keeps tons of construction waste from the landfills and provides a conduit for the City to use in obtaining federal grants, we are requesting the City assist ASG with its involuntary move from its current location.” Preservation Greensboro attached an estimate of $18,00 from Delancey Street Moving & Transportation.

Council briefly shared their support for the work done by Architectural Salvage before resolving to fund the organization the full $18,000. Members were impressed by the amount of material Architectural Salvage has been able to keep out of City landfills.

Councilman Zack Matheny said, “I consider this a thank you for saving the taxpayers money.”

Sharon Hightower said that Architectural Salvage had been very helpful during the restoration of Magnolia Manor outside of Greensboro. (see correction.)

Architectural Salvage will be moving away from downtown to a new location on Wendover Avenue.

IMG_0377Correction: This post has been updated to reflect the location of Magnolia Manor just outside of Greensboro in Colfax.

 

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4 thoughts on “Architectural Salvage to Receive Supplemental Funding for Involuntary Move

  1. From the article: “Since 1993 Architectural Salvage has kept an estimated 20 tons of construction debris from being dumped into landfills”

    20 Tons equals 80 Thousand pounds. 2 Tractor-trailer loads. Not very much in 30 years.

  2. Sharon Hightower said that Architectural Salvage had been very helpful during the restoration of Magnolia Manor in Greensboro.

    While Hightower may have said that, the reporter should have noted that facility is not in Greensboro — relevant to the question of whether or not the City of Greensboro should be offering financial support to the organization and Hightower’s reasoning.

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